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A collection of papers that describe the importance of biodiversity in the sea and examines the issues around protection of worldwide biodiversity under severe threat from over exploitation.

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This file has a .pdf extensionPhoenix Islands Expedition 2013 Marine Survey Short Report
Author(s): Vince Kerr

A report on the marine survey work carried out in the Phoenix Islands in 2013

Added to archive on 09/13/2015 and placed in the following categories: Marine Biodiversity International | Pacific Whale Research and Conservation |

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This file has a .pdf extensionCoral Reef Survey of Northwest New Caledonina, Rapid Assessment Program Report #53
Author(s): Vince Kerr

A Conservation International survey of the northwest corner of New Caledonia

Added to archive on 09/13/2015 and placed in the following categories: Marine Biodiversity International |

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This file has a .pdf extensionPhoenix Islands 2013 Survey Marine short report
Author(s): Vince Kerr

Ten scuba and seven snorkel survey dives were completed. Rapid assessment survey results
for large fish were generally consistent with the NEAQ results of the 2000 and 2002
expeditions and the author’s previous survey Kerr and Wragg, (2006). Coral health
observations were also roughly consistent with previous surveys. No significant coral
bleaching symptoms were observed.

Added to archive on 11/25/2013 and placed in the following categories: Marine Biodiversity International |

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This file has a .pdf extensionProposal for Ross Sea MPA
Author(s): COMMISSION FOR THE CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC MARINE LIVING RESOURCES

The delegations of New Zealand and the United States propose the establishment by the Commission
for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources􀀃(Commission or CCAMLR) of a marine
protected area (MPA) in the Ross Sea Region (“Ross Sea Region Marine Protected Area”). In
recognition of the exceptional ecological value and scientific importance of the Ross Sea Region, our
delegations propose to establish this MPA to conserve living marine resources; maintain ecosystem
structure and function; protect vital ecosystem processes and areas of ecological significance; and
establish reference areas that will promote scientific research. This proposal is consistent with
Conservation Measure 91-04 (2011) and the scientific conclusions and processes, reviewed by the
Scientific Committee, from which the United States and New Zealand developed their original MPA
scenarios for the Ross Sea Region. This proposal was last submitted to CCAMLR as CCAMLRXXXI/
16 Rev. 1 on October 29, 2012, during the 31st Meeting of the Commission. Except where noted
in strikethrough/bold, the text of the proposed Conservation Measure is the same as that submitted on
October 29, 2012. The delegations of New Zealand and the United States appreciate the many
comments received from other Members on proposals for a Ross Sea Region MPA, including at
CCAMLR XXX, XXXI and intersessionally. We look forward to working together with Members in
Bremerhaven to achieve consensus to establish this MPA.

Added to archive on 07/07/2013 and placed in the following categories: Marine Biodiversity International | MPA's and Networks International | MPA Process | MPA Systems and Case Studies | MPA Network and Marine Reserve Design | Marine Reserve Research and Monitoring International | Ross Sea | MPA Process and Policy | MPA Proposals and Applications |

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This file has a .pdf extensionPacific Islands regional guidelines for Whale and Dolphin watching 2008
Author(s): South Pacific Whale Research Consortium

Whale Watching Guidelines

Added to archive on 06/18/2009 and placed in the following categories: Marine Biodiversity International | MPA's and Networks International | Pacific Whale Research and Conservation |

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This file has a .pdf extensionReport on Annual meeting of the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium
Author(s): South Pacific Whale Research Consortium

This report from the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium is for the consideration of the Scientific Committee of the International Whaling Commission

Added to archive on 06/18/2009 and placed in the following categories: Fisheries Management International | Marine Biodiversity International | MPA's and Networks International | Pacific Whale Research and Conservation |

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This file has a .doc extensionNational Marine Sancturies for whales in the Pacific
Author(s): South Pacific Whale Research Consortium

National Marine Sancturies in the Pacific relating to Whales

Added to archive on 06/18/2009 and placed in the following categories: Marine Biodiversity International | MPA's and Networks International | Pacific Whale Research and Conservation |

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This file has a .pdf extensionMystery of the missing Humpbacks
Author(s): Science Mag

Whale Stocks - illegal hunting
Mystery of the Missing Humpbacks solved by Soviet Data http://www.sciencemag.org 

Added to archive on 06/18/2009 and placed in the following categories: Marine Biodiversity International | MPA's and Networks International | Pacific Whale Research and Conservation |

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This file has a .pdf extensionImpacts of Biodiversity Loss on Ocean Ecosystem Services
Author(s): Boris Worm

Human-dominated marine ecosystems are experiencing accelerating loss of populations and species, with largely unknown consequences. We analyzed local experiments, long-term regional time series, and global fisheries data to test how biodiversity loss affects marine ecosystem services across temporal and spatial scales. Overall, rates of resource collapse increased and recovery potential, stability, and water quality decreased exponentially with declining diversity. Restoration of biodiversity, in contrast, increased productivity fourfold and decreased variability by 21%, on average. We conclude that marine biodiversity loss is increasingly impairing the ocean’s capacity to provide food, maintain water quality, and recover from perturbations. Yet available data suggest that at this point, these trends are still reversible.

 

Added to archive on 07/15/2007 and placed in the following categories: Marine Biodiversity International |

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This file has a .pdf extensionShifting Baselines, Marine Reserves, and Leopold’s Biotic Ethic
Author(s): James Bohnsack

The author submits that different human expectations and environmental ethics are key factors preventing the creation of marine reserve networks. A declining base-line in the Carribean is shown based on Nassau grouper landings from Cuba and the US. Common and often conflcting types of conservation ethics in North America is reviewed. The author submits that Leopold’s biotic ethic provides a framework for achieving sustainable resource use based on laws of ecology and human self-interest, although it is accepted that implementing successful marine reserve networks would be a slow and incremental process. The paper concludes that the establishment of no-take marine reserves can help restore human expectations and provide a common basis for conservation by providing a window to the past and vision for the future.

Added to archive on 06/22/2007 and placed in the following categories: Marine Biodiversity International |

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